How to Plan a Novel

Why I’m sharing my 5-step process for planning a novel…

So, if you know me already you will be aware that every year I take on the task of NaNoWriMo to write a 50k word novel in the month of November. This is my playground – the testing of an idea that I usually have earlier in the year, to see if the plot has merit or my characters aren’t flawed enough. I love it; but I would never attempt to do it from scratch. Now, I always rely on a sketched out plan to guide me through.

gray dream freestanding letters

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Only once have I truly ‘pantsed’ it – with the challenge of my spy thriller novel, written on a dare from my writing group. For that one, I had about 1,500 words to start me off, written as an exercise for a genre we wouldn’t typically write. That 1,500 word opening had thugs wearing only trench coats shooting at a character I had no backstory for! As it turned out, not planning was both stressful and exhilarating, but it didn’t make for a good manuscript in the end. So, despite finishing it up and being quite charmed by the whole thing, I put it aside and it’s now filed away…perhaps it will get it’s outing one day, perhaps not.

For all my other novels, I always have at least a road-map that guides my direction of travel. I plan the opening concept – the ‘what if’ that the story hangs on. I do a bit of work on my main characters; what they want and how they aren’t going to get it without a challenge of some kind. And, most of the time I have a vague imagining of when and where all this takes place and how these might add to the atmosphere of the novel.

In fact, I’ve realised I follow a simple 5-step formula that allows me to build a great outline for my story, whilst also allowing me the freedom to explore the novel’s breadth and detail when I write.

This means I am never intimated by the blank page.

Every writing session I know exactly what I need to get onto the page. I understand my character motivations, and that I need to get them from point A to point B. Sometimes I don’t know how…but that’s part of the fun of writing the first draft I think. So, I don’t constrain myself with too much planning; just enough to ensure the shape of the story is compelling enough for 90k words.

When I was first starting out, what I wouldn’t have done for such a simple strategy! It took me three years to finish my first manuscript – because my story was off, then my characters weren’t right, and finally when I did write ‘The End’ I was almost so bored of working on it I had to put it away for a few months.

Now I write a new novel every year. Not all of them will make it to the agenting stage – so far I’ve only submitted three out of eight. But, when I do get that publishing deal I’ll certainly not be intimated by the thought of writing new books, year after year after year. I love planning and writing them far too much.

The 5-day Plan Your Novel Challenge!

PYN Challenge tileYet, because I know how much I struggled in the early days of my novel-writing, I’ve decided to share my process. That’s why I’m doing the 5-day Plan Your Novel Challenge at the end of the month as part of my coaching offer for The Write Catalyst.

From 26-30 June I will guide you though the process of finding and refining your novel’s idea, character, and time and location. Plus, there’ll be a trouble-shooting workshop on the final day so we can tackle any stumbling blocks you might come across along the way. 

If you’ve always wanted to write a novel, or have tried before and given up; this challenge is for you! And, because I want to make sure that as many people as possible follow their dreams, it’s a FREE resource.
No cost except your email address, participation, and a promise to yourself that 2020 is the year that you will write that book!

Want in? All you have to do is sign up here: The Write Catalyst 5-day Plan Your Novel Challenge

See you in the challenge, I hope!


  • Copy of logo 3Do you already have a part-written manuscript, but struggle to keep up the momentum?
  • Perhaps you’ve run out of plot, or aren’t sure how to fix what you now realising are glaring errors in your story?
  • Or worse, have you simply lost your writing mojo altogether?

As The Write Catalyst, I can help! 
With a decade’s experience of writing novels; I’m familiar with lots of the issues and challenges that writers face when attempting to get that story on the page.
Why not book in a free virtual cuppa with me, and let’s talk it out. 
Book in here!


 

 

2 thoughts on “How to Plan a Novel

  1. I’ve basically pantsed my way through entire novels, only to learn that I dreaded going back to rewrite all the plot holes and flat characters. For my next novel, I think I’m going to try some extensive outlining to reduce that pain. Thanks for sharing your process!

    • Yep! I’m not a huge fan of editing, so prefer to make sure I’m on the right track with story and character before I commit to writing a full length novel! Glad that this post helped you; will you be joining the free challenge?

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