Challenging start to the year? Change that, now.

January is a harsh month. Not just because here in the UK it’s cold, usually wet, and seemingly always so dark, but it’s also a long month – payday is a long way away, the majority of funds have been spent at Christmas, or for Christmas, and now it’s back to work with the next opportunity for Bank Holiday relaxation in April, for Easter.

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One of my January snaps: a chill as the sun goes down.

It’s also this time of year that we try and install new habits and approaches in our lives, and inevitably fail! So as the end of the month finally arrives, we tend to feel broke, weary, and deflated. It’s ‘just another year’, and we fall back to our default position, and our usual internal monologues that encourage us to do those things we ‘should’ do, way before those things we dream we want to do.

I have to admit, if you read those previous paragraphs with a heavy heart and nodding head, I’m there with you. I had so many ambitious plans for the month, and almost every single one of them have been obliterated in the fog of procrastination, avoidance, and sometimes laziness.

But, and this is a big BUT, this does not define my year. We all know January is a hard month. It is an annual refrain! Yet, one of the many things I dedicated myself to this year was to read for at least twenty minutes a day. You know what? I’ve read a total of six books so far this year…This I am pleased with (and I still might have time to sneak another one in!).

Still. No, I didn’t manage to commit to my stretches every other day. And no, my outline for the novel and character arcs for each of the main characters hasn’t been completed. No, I haven’t touched that list of independent publishers I put together in the first week of the year to investigate submissions. And, sorry, no I didn’t quite manage to own it at work everyday and push through some of the tasks I promised myself would get done by the end of this week.

I did, however, try.

For the first four years, this blog’s tagline was – I would much prefer to say ‘I tried and failed’ rather than ‘I didn’t even bother’This is just as true today as it was then. As my friend and mentor Jo Bendle would say – Reward effort, not results. Because sometimes you can’t control the results, but what you can do is take ownership of your efforts.

I know what didn’t get done. In some cases, I know why it didn’t happen. Which means I’m now much better equipped to tackle it in the coming weeks. I don’t even have to wait until February to review my month and make a plan. I can start right now.

And I did: by writing this blog post.

One more thing off my January goal list.


 

IMG_20190105_130248899Did you see my short story in February’s Writing Magazine? So pleased to be a winner for their competition based on the theme of ‘hate’. Really pushed me to create a character with a complex personality and situation.
One more piece on my way to the dream of becoming a novelist.


Purchase my short story collection: azon.co.uk/Memorial-Tree-other-short-stories-ebook/dp/B07F1T7H98


 

How to start the best year yet

Ah, so that’s another year gone. Once upon a time I would lament all the things I had not managed to achieve – not getting an agent for the novel, not being published, or winning no competitions; hell, sometimes it was even not bothering to enter those competitions. Always the focus was on the things I didn’t do.

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Photo by Snapwire on Pexels.com

Now, it’s different. Now I focus on the positives, the tasks I did get done, the accolades I have collected. Self-publishing my short story collection, being published in a Comma Press anthology, being shortlisted in a competition…Whatever the things I didn’t do, it doesn’t really matter. Do you know why? Because I still have chance to do all of those things in 2019.

Most of the things we regret are the things we didn’t do, and that’s fine. But there is a balance to be had. You don’t think about all the amazing stuff you did because you did it and it’s in the past, all of those tasks left undone those are the ones that bubble to surface instead. However, this new year I challenge you to flip this and make a huge, great list of everything you did do. Not just the successes, but the efforts too. It all counts. If you entered competitions and didn’t win, or submitted to an agent or three and heard nothing but rejections back – these tiny little slivers of effort demonstrates how you committed to your goals.

It should also be remembered that sometimes, we have no direct control over the outcomes. You can’t force an agent to sign you as a client, or make a judge choose your story as the winning entry – not really. So you shouldn’t be focusing on those types of ‘have nots’ anyway. If you submitted anything, that’s a win. That’s a clear sign of progress. Perhaps you didn’t submit at all, perhaps all you did was write more words, or manage to finish a story, or even just put pen to paper or fingers to keyboards for the very first time. Celebrate these things. Even a small step forward is still the right direction. You only have control over your own actions, so all you can do is try your best and make it count.

Start 2019 with your head held high for all the positive action you took in 2018. Forget about the regrets, or the ‘should have done’ tasks, because they don’t really count. What matters is you made it. And if you should have any lingering regrets then write them down, figure out an action plan, and stick to it in the new year. Let’s face it, you don’t want to end 2019 with the same regret; right?

But the key thing is to remind yourself of all the good you did, and take that with you into the new year. That’s all you need; the truth of it is, starting the year with a positive mantra of all you have achieved will give you that much more confidence, and perhaps a pinch of bravery. And who knows what might come out of that…